Feeds:
Posts
Comments

by Tom Nelson

Path Finder 7 from Cocoatech is a Finder replacement that brings superior file management capabilities to the Mac.

CocktailIconWide

Image courtesy of Maintain

If you work a great deal with your Mac’s files, you’ve probably found that the Finder, while adequate for most uses, is a bit of a stumblebum when it comes to speed, advanced features, and customization

Read more on About: Macs.

by Tom Nelson

It happens to the best of them; an application simply stops responding to input. You may not be able to access the application’s menus or the application just seems frozen. Sometimes you will even see the SPOD (Spinning Pinwheel of Death), an indication that the application is frozen, or at least hung up waiting for something to happen.

ForceQuit

Screen shot © Coyote Moon, Inc.

When all else fails, you can use the Force Quit option to terminate a rogue application and return control to your Mac.

Read more on About: Macs.

by Tom Nelson

Screen sharing capability is built into the Mac. With it, you can access a remote Mac’s desktop, and view and manipulate files, folders, and applications, just as if you were sitting in front of the remote Mac.

ScreenSharingFinder

Screen shot © Coyote Moon, Inc.

This makes Mac screen sharing a go-to application whenever you need access to a remote Mac. For example, it’s great for helping someone troubleshoot a problem. With Mac screen sharing, you can see exactly what’s happening on the remote Mac, and help diagnose and fix the problem.

Mac screen sharing is also an excellent way to access documents and applications on your Mac when you’re in another location. Let’s say you use Quicken to track and manage your family’s finances. It would be nice if you could update your Quicken files from any Mac you have at home, but Quicken wasn’t designed for multiple users accessing the same data files. So, when you’re sitting in the den and you decide to make an online purchase, you have to remember to get up and go to the home office, and update your Quicken account.

Read more on About: Macs.

by Tom Nelson

Launchpad, the application launcher that Apple introduced with OS X Lion (10.7), was an attempt to bring a touch of iOS to the Mac’s OS X operating system. Like its iOS counterpart, Launchpad displays all of the applications you have installed on your Mac in a simple interface of app icons spread across your Mac’s display. A click on an app’s icon launches the application, letting you get right to work (or play).

launchpad

Screen shot © Coyote Moon, Inc.

Launchpad is pretty simple. It displays app icons until it fills up your display, and then creates another page of icons that you can access with a swipe, just like in iOS. If you don’t have a gesture-enabled input device, such as the Magic Mouse or Magic Trackpad, or a built-in trackpad, you can still move from page to page with a simple click of the page indicators at the bottom of the Launchpad.

Read more on About: Macs.

by Tom Nelson

Question: My Mac displays a question mark when it boots. What is it trying to tell me?

When I turn my Mac on, it displays a flashing question mark for several seconds before booting. Is this anything I should worry about?

Answer: The flashing question mark is your Mac’s way of telling you that it’s having trouble finding a bootable operating system.

Read more on About: Macs.

by Tom Nelson

Selecting the right font for a project can sometimes be a difficult task. Many applications display previews of fonts in their Font menu, but the preview is limited to the name of the font; you don’t get to see the entire alphabet, not to mention numbers, punctuation, and symbols. You can use Font Book to see the whole enchilada.

FontBookSamplePrint

Screen shot © Coyote Moon, Inc.

Previewing Fonts

Launch Font Book, located at /Applications/Font Book, and click the target font to select it. Click the disclosure triangle next to the font’s name to display its available typefaces (such as Regular, Italic, Semibold, Bold), and then click the typeface you want to preview.

The default preview displays a font’s letters and numbers (or images, if it’s a dingbat font). Use the slider on the right side of the window to reduce or enlarge the display size of the font, or use the Size dropdown menu in the top right corner of the window to select a particular type size.

Read more on About: Macs.

by Tom Nelson

A single Mac mini was in stock in the refurb store this morning, but unfortunately, it’s a 2014 model with only 4 GB of RAM. Since the RAM in the 2014 minis can’t be upgraded, think carefully about how you plan to use the mini before you consider purchasing it.

On a brighter note, the 27-inch Retina iMacs continue to be in stock, and there are additional models available this week, including the sought-after model with the Quad-Core i7 processor.

2014macbookair

Image courtesy of Apple

Deals of the Week

Since we mentioned the 27-inch Retina iMac, let’s start our deals of the week there, with a very versatile 3.5 GHz Quad-Core i5 model at a very nice price that’s only slightly above the $2,000 mark. Now that’s a pretty good deal.

Our second deal is a 2013 15.4-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display that provides much more performance than the MacBook Air, and includes 8 GB of RAM and a 256 GB SSD.

Don’t forget that for any Mac you buy, you should consider an external drive for backup and additional storage, if you need it.

Quantities are limited, so if any of these tickle your fancy, be fast on the trigger to make a purchase.

Read more on About: Macs.

by Tom Nelson

Path Finder 7 from Cocoatech is a Finder replacement that brings superior file management capabilities to the Mac.

PathFinder

Image courtesy of Cocoatech

If you work a great deal with your Mac’s files, you’ve probably found that the Finder, while adequate for most uses, is a bit of a stumblebum when it comes to speed, advanced features, and customization

Read more on About: Macs.

by Tom Nelson

Weekly Mac news roundup for the week of April 10, 2015.

MacBookAllColors

Image courtesy of Apple

Apple started selling the new 12-inch MacBook along with the Apple Watch today, with mixed results. MacBooks were hard to find in stock, and the Apple Watch quickly slipped its shipping estimates.

Read more on About: Macs

by Tom Nelson

When we come across a new or interesting web page, most of us can’t resist the urge to share it. The usual way to share a web site with a colleague or friend is to send them the URL, but Safari has a better way. You can use Safari to email the whole page.

SafariShareEmailThisPage

Screen shot © Coyote Moon, Inc.

  • From the File menu, select either Share/Email this Page, or Mail Contents of This Page (depending on the version of Safari you are using), or press command+I (the command key plus an upper case letter “i”). Safari will send the page to Mail, which will open a new message that contains the web page. You can add a note, if you like, by clicking in the top of the message.
  • Enter the email address of the recipient and click Send.

Read more on About: Macs.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 53 other followers