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Archive for September 10th, 2015

by Tom Nelson

OS X El Capitan once again sets the upgrade install as the default method of performing an installation. This means if you start downloading the El Capitan installer from the Mac App Store, and get up to have some tea, when you come back, it’s very likely that you’ll be looking at the El Capitan installer screen waiting for you to click the Continue button.

As tempting as it may be to get on with the installation, I recommend quitting the installer at this point, and taking care of some setup details first.

ElCapitanDesktop1

Screen shot © Coyote Moon, Inc.

What You Need to Run OS X El Capitan

El Capitan was announced at WWDC 2015, and will go through a public beta process beginning in July 2015, finishing with a public release on September 30, 2015. Before you decide to participate in the public beta, or install the new Mac operating system once it’s released, you should take a look at which Macs will support the OS, and what the minimum specifications are. You can find out if your Mac is up to snuff by taking a look at this guide:

OS X El Capitan Minimum Requirements

Once you have determined that your Mac meets the requirements, you’re almost ready to proceed with installing the new system. But first, you need to take a few preliminary steps to ensure that your Mac is ready to successfully install the OS, and that you’ll have a trouble-free installation process.

Read more on About: Macs.

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by Tom Nelson

OS X El Capitan, the latest version of OS X as of the summer of 2015, is available from the Mac App Store as a free download. Like previous versions of OS X, El Capitan has the annoying habit of automatically starting the installation process once the download is complete.

OSXElCapitanDock

Screen shot © Coyote Moon, Inc.

This would be fine if all you wanted to do was quickly install El Capitan as an upgrade install over your existing version of OS X.

But even if this is your goal, it’s not too likely that you’re actually ready to start the install process. After all, there’s quite a bit of housekeeping to be done before you commit to installing OS X El Capitan: that includes having a recent backup of your data, and making a bootable OS X El Capitan installer on a USB flash drive.

Having a bootable installer for OS X El Capitan is a good idea, even if your plan is just to perform an upgrade install, which technically doesn’t need to be done from a separate boot device. But having your own copy of El Capitan on a separate device ensures that you’ll always be able to install or reinstall it, or perform basic Mac troubleshooting tasks, even if you have no connection to the Internet or access to the Mac App Store, should you need to re-download El Capitan.

Read more on About: Macs.

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