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Archive for October 18th, 2016

by Tom Nelson

With each new release of the Mac operating system, there are always a few secret features, services, and tips hidden away, just waiting to be uncovered. macOS Sierra is no different, so the Rocket Yard has gathered a list of tips and tricks that can make you more productive, or at the very least, amuse you and make you wonder why Apple thought this needed to be squirrelled away from the general public.

Window Snapping

OS X El Capitan included a new Split View feature that allowed two apps to share a display, much like the older Full Screen viewing option allowed a single app to take over your entire monitor. The Split View feature allowed two apps to share the entire display.

windowsnapping1280

Screen shot © Coyote Moon, Inc.

With macOS Sierra, the ability to manage windows received a new feature: Window Snapping. While the older Split View was designed for use with two different apps, Window Snapping is more about aligning one window to another one, just to help you keep your window arrangement looking neat, or to help you easily set up multiple windows for non-overlapping access.

Read more on Rocket Yard, The MacSales.com Blog

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by Tom Nelson

Have you noticed something missing? Ever since OS X Lion, your Mac has been hiding the Library folder. This trend of hiding folders that contain important preferences your Mac uses has continued, even though the Mac operating system name changed to macOS.

unhidelibraryfolder

Screen shot © Coyote Moon, Inc.

Before OS X Lion, the library folder could be found at:

Users/home folder/

where ‘home folder’ is the short name of your currently logged in user account. For example, if your account’s short name is bettyo, the path to your Library would be:

Users/bettyo/Library

The Library folder contains many of the resources that installed applications need to use, including application preference files, application support files, plug-in folders, and ever since OS X Lion, the plists that describe the saved state of applications.

Read more on About: Macs.

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