Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for January 4th, 2018

by Coyote Moon, Inc.

If you’ll forgive us for bragging a little, our resident Mac expert, Tom Nelson, recently took the top spot in MacSales.com’s Year in Review: The 10 Most Popular Rocket Yard Posts of 2017. As a matter of fact, he nabbed the 3rd, 4th, and 5th spots, too.

Tom was also awarded two of the five Editor’s Picks. We may have to enlarge our offices, so his swelled head can fit through the doors and halls. Actually, Tom is the modest type, so we have to toot his horn for him, and we’re happy to do it.

Here’s the original article:

Year in Review: The 10 Most Popular Rocket Yard Posts of 2017
Author:

The year 2017 was a big one for tech enthusiasts. New gear and software news – both good and not-so-good – dominated the headlines.

So which news articles and tech tips most caught the interest of Rocket Yard readers? These are the top 10 most read articles of the year!

1) Common Problems During and After macOS High Sierra Installation

The beautiful default wallpaper of High Sierra
Despite going through the typical beta process, macOS 10.13 High Sierra didn’t quite have all the kinks worked out upon release. We outlined some of the most common issues that users faced during and after macOS High Sierra installation.


2) Translating Apple’s New High Sierra & APFS Compatibility Document

Apple File System
With macOS High Sierra came the much-hyped Apple File System, or simply APFS. But this confused both beginner and some seasoned Mac users alike. The Rocket Yard took the opportunity to translate Apple’s High Sierra & APFS compatibility document.


3) Tech Tip: How to Use Boot Camp on an External Drive

Three available tasks for Boot Camp Assistant
As author Tom Nelson wrote “Installing Windows on an external drive would be a great solution to the problem of available space, but as we said, Boot Camp and Windows impose a restriction on installing to an external drive – or do they?” Check out the article to find out more!


4) How to Combine Multiple Photos Libraries Into a Single Library


Managing multiple Photos libraries is a common problem among Mac users. We wanted to create a single guide to help users combine all of those libraries into a single library. See how it’s done inside.


5) macOS 101: What High Sierra Broke and How to Fix It


With almost any new operating system, new problems seem to crop up upon install and things just don’t work like they used to. We outlined some of the most reported issues caused by High Sierra and how to fix them. Our readers also commented with problems of their own.


The Rest of the Best:

6) Understanding macOS Server Part 1: Background and Setup

7) Create a Bootable macOS High Sierra Install Drive with DiskMaker X 7

8) Apps With Known High Sierra Compatibility Issues

9) Unboxing and Teardown of the 2017 27-inch iMac with Retina 5K

10) Three Ways to Remotely Access and Control a Mac


Editor’s Picks: 

 OWC Tears Down the iMac Pro, Announces Future Memory Upgrade Programs

 Commentary: Mac Pro Users Spoke and Apple Listened

 Rocket Yard Testing Lab: Battle of the Mac Browsers (And One Beta)

 Data Privacy Day: Keep Your Data Safe From Prying Eyes with FileVault

• Quick Tip: View All Mac OS Terminal Commands and What They Do

Read more on Rocket Yard, The MacSales.com Blog

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

by Tom Nelson

Macs have been at the center of many creative endeavors since the first Mac took the stage at De Anza College in 1984, at its official unveiling. Since then, the Mac community has been finding new and amazing uses for their Macs. It’s no wonder, then, that you’re likely to find a Mac taking center stage in many professional and home-based film and video studios.

There are a number of Mac models used in home and pro studio work, but we’re going to take a look at two popular desktop models: 2011 and later iMacs, and 2010 and later Mac Pros. We chose these two model families because of their popularity, cost, and ability to be upgraded with RAM, storage, peripherals, and software that can turn them into film and video editing machines.

If you’re ready to hit the road to Sundance, let’s get started outfitting your Mac for its new editing role.

Upgrading RAM in an iMac
For the most part, 2011 and later iMacs have memory that can be upgraded by the end user. There are some exceptions, such as the 2014 through 2016 21.5-inch iMacs, which made use of RAM soldered directly to the motherboard, thus preventing a viable upgrade path. But the rest of the iMac family all has some method that allows you to increase the amount of RAM installed.

Increasing the RAM is going to allow your Mac to better function as an editing platform. Most editing applications are able to make use of all of the RAM you make available to them, increasing their performance, reducing rendering times, or just making the editing process a simpler one.

If you’re wondering how much RAM you need, my answer is all that you can afford. If you can max out your RAM, you’ll likely see a nice improvement; at a minimum for small HD-based projects, 16 GB is a good start. If your editing work involves multiple layers, multiple cameras, or 4K and larger projects, then I suggest 32 GB as a minimum, which is more likely to help with performance.

That leaves the 2017 21.5-inch iMac and 2017 27-inch iMac, which don’t have memory modules that are accessible from the outside, but do have internal memory slots that can be upgraded, though with a degree of difficulty best left to advanced DIYers.

If you’re considering the new 2017 iMac Pro as an editing machine, take a look at the OWC tear down of the 2017 iMac Pro, which reveals that the RAM can be upgraded, though again, not easily.

Read more on Rocket Yard, The MacSales.com Blog

Read Full Post »